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Eva Fedderly

Financial ignorance can take toll at work, home

It’s July, and for many business owners, mid-year is an opportune time for a financial reset to keep the year’s goal in focus to alleviate headaches later. It’s the same for individuals, and growing financial stresses may create workplace and productivity problems for them and their employer.

Wilmington Island shop creates custom pieces of furniture

Bart Haigh moved from Connecticut to Savannah two years ago where he launched a custom furniture design shop, Haigh Wood Shop, out of his garage on Wilmington Island.

Bart Haigh, owner of Haigh Wood Shop, builds custom furniture at his shop on Wilmington Island. (Steve Bisson/Savannah Morning News)

Film roles mean big bucks for Savannah business

In movie plots, small entreprenuers often realize big dreams through hard work and timing. It’s a true story for many local businesses as the film industry discovers Savannah.

Film roles mean big bucks for Savannah business

In movie plots, small entreprenuers often realize big dreams through hard work and timing. It’s a true story for many local businesses as the film industry discovers Savannah.

Savannah woman uses business to empower girls

Nikki White says her career started in business, but her heart has always been in the nonprofit sector.

Nikki White

Continuing education enhances business, brings its own rewards

The “abilities” — availability, flexibility and affordability — are luring more business professionals than ever to pursue continuing education. And many are finding it the key to advancement, say educators who have made lifetime learning their business.

Good plans put outside space to work

Spring is here, and many businesses look to invest in outdoor spaces, helping properties gain value and look attractive at the same time.

Paris Market owner finds Broughton effort worthwhile

New Orleans native Paula Danyluk opened up her retail, coffee shop and design services space, the Paris Market and Brocante, on Broughton Street when “people were pioneers to launch storefronts there.”

Paula Danyluk, owner of the Paris Market & Brocante on West Broughton Street. (Steve Bisson/Savannah Morning News)

Business group hears Gulfstream’s philosophy of strength in diversity

Savannah’s Downtown Business Association got a dose of politics and a look at how Gulfstream is working to grow work capacity in the community.

A Squad Bake Shop owner brings her own flair

Natasha Gaskill left Lulu’s Chocolate Bar in 2013 to launch a wedding cake business, and now her A Squad Bake Shop is a unique operation known for its pastries, donuts and cakes at some of Savannah’s best dining establishments.

Natasha Gaskill, owner of A-Squad Bake Shop, stands inside her 10-by-16 foot baking cottage in her backyard. (Josh Galemore/Savannah Morning News)

Vintage looks make new business

In a throwaway economy, some local entrepreneurs have found value and mission in the recycled, once-loved clothing market.

Business of Love: Finding right match for your work

Savannah has long been a mecca for weddings, both local and destination. The impact that the weddings have on small businesses, such as event planners, rental companies, caterers, photographers, and musicians, is significant. It is also these small vendors and the variety of styles they provide that can make all the difference couples who plan ahead.

Savannah service clubs move community projects

Savannah’s dozens of service clubs and organizations play a large role in providing money and support for the community, while offering members an opportunity to network locally.

Tree businesses work to restore urban forest

Iconic for its trees, namely live oaks and gum, 36 percent of Chatham County is shaded with canopy, and the urban forest is a business opportunity for skilled landscapers and arborists.

Mark Clean, a Specialist Forrester with the Georgia Forestry Division, inspects a tree in Jaycees Park which fell due to winds from Hurricane Matthew. (Josh Galemore/Savannah Morning News)

BiS profile: Diane Lee of Georgia Tech

business profile - Diane Lee; director of Georgia Tech-Savannah

Diane Lee, Director of Georgia Tech-Savannah, sits in the conference room of their building on Technology Circle. (Josh Galemore/Savannah Morning News)

Pop-up shop brings designer fashions to town

New York City-based Roz Morris and Savannah local Abbie May Hastings collaborated to launch the Trustees’ Garden Pop-Up event to spotlight the two distinct cities’ entrepreneurs, artists, and designers for a 10-day event.

Roz Morris, left, and Abbie May Hastings launched the Trustees’ Garden Pop-Up event. (Eva Fedderly/For the Savannah Morning News)

City manager to speak at Hispanic chamber

The Metro-Savannah Hispanic Chamber of Commerce will hold its second annual gala and awards banquet Oct. 29 at the DeSoto Hilton, where Savannah’s new city manager, Rob Hernandez, will be the keynote speaker.

Rob Hernandez

Woodworkers preserve trees after Hurricane Matthew

A group of Savannah woodworkers have united in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew to preserve wood from trees that fell as a result of the storm.

Charley Ward, co-owner of Slowvannah Farms, straps down pieces of an elm tree. He will cut, dry and build furniture from the wood. (Photo by Steve Bisson/SMN)

Savannah-based entrepreneurs use iPads, iPhones to expedite chronic wound care

A company in Savannah is seeking to change the way the health care industry handles chronic wound care. Local health care veterans Katherine Piette and Joseph Ebberwein founded Corstrata one year ago in order to provide a new model to treat chronic wounds, which they say is more efficient and cost effective. 

Joseph Ebberwein and Katherine Piette, right, demonstrate a telemedicine consultation with Myra Varnado, Corstrata wound care specialist nurse located in New Orleans, using the company's live video app. (Steve Bisson/Savannah Morning News)

Self-defense business holds steady, true

While sales can collide with community fears, proprietors of self-defense businesses say their missions are more about personal safety, responsibility and awareness. “We try not to capitalize on the negatives,” said Thunderbolt Guns’ manager, Luther Loughridge. “But we want everyone to be safe.”