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Eva Fedderly

Vintage looks make new business

In a throwaway economy, some local entrepreneurs have found value and mission in the recycled, once-loved clothing market.

Business of Love: Finding right match for your work

Savannah has long been a mecca for weddings, both local and destination. The impact that the weddings have on small businesses, such as event planners, rental companies, caterers, photographers, and musicians, is significant. It is also these small vendors and the variety of styles they provide that can make all the difference couples who plan ahead.

Savannah service clubs move community projects

Savannah’s dozens of service clubs and organizations play a large role in providing money and support for the community, while offering members an opportunity to network locally.

Tree businesses work to restore urban forest

Iconic for its trees, namely live oaks and gum, 36 percent of Chatham County is shaded with canopy, and the urban forest is a business opportunity for skilled landscapers and arborists.

Mark Clean, a Specialist Forrester with the Georgia Forestry Division, inspects a tree in Jaycees Park which fell due to winds from Hurricane Matthew. (Josh Galemore/Savannah Morning News)

BiS profile: Diane Lee of Georgia Tech

business profile - Diane Lee; director of Georgia Tech-Savannah

Diane Lee, Director of Georgia Tech-Savannah, sits in the conference room of their building on Technology Circle. (Josh Galemore/Savannah Morning News)

Pop-up shop brings designer fashions to town

New York City-based Roz Morris and Savannah local Abbie May Hastings collaborated to launch the Trustees’ Garden Pop-Up event to spotlight the two distinct cities’ entrepreneurs, artists, and designers for a 10-day event.

Roz Morris, left, and Abbie May Hastings launched the Trustees’ Garden Pop-Up event. (Eva Fedderly/For the Savannah Morning News)

City manager to speak at Hispanic chamber

The Metro-Savannah Hispanic Chamber of Commerce will hold its second annual gala and awards banquet Oct. 29 at the DeSoto Hilton, where Savannah’s new city manager, Rob Hernandez, will be the keynote speaker.

Rob Hernandez

Woodworkers preserve trees after Hurricane Matthew

A group of Savannah woodworkers have united in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew to preserve wood from trees that fell as a result of the storm.

Charley Ward, co-owner of Slowvannah Farms, straps down pieces of an elm tree. He will cut, dry and build furniture from the wood. (Photo by Steve Bisson/SMN)

Savannah-based entrepreneurs use iPads, iPhones to expedite chronic wound care

A company in Savannah is seeking to change the way the health care industry handles chronic wound care. Local health care veterans Katherine Piette and Joseph Ebberwein founded Corstrata one year ago in order to provide a new model to treat chronic wounds, which they say is more efficient and cost effective. 

Joseph Ebberwein and Katherine Piette, right, demonstrate a telemedicine consultation with Myra Varnado, Corstrata wound care specialist nurse located in New Orleans, using the company's live video app. (Steve Bisson/Savannah Morning News)

Self-defense business holds steady, true

While sales can collide with community fears, proprietors of self-defense businesses say their missions are more about personal safety, responsibility and awareness. “We try not to capitalize on the negatives,” said Thunderbolt Guns’ manager, Luther Loughridge. “But we want everyone to be safe.”

District attorney: Solving crime problem will take concerted efforts

District Attorney Meg Heap told 50 local business owners Thursday that there’s no magic to solve Savannah’s crime challenges and encouraged them to lobby their legislators for more information on criminals.

Self-defense business holds steady, true

While sales can collide with community fears, proprietors of self-defense businesses say their missions are more about personal safety, responsibility and awareness. “We try not to capitalize on the negatives,” said Thunderbolt Guns’ manager, Luther Loughridge. “But we want everyone to be safe.”

BiS profile: Mark Howard, Howard Financial Group

The motivation for launching Howard Financial Group initially came after my father passed away, and I saw firsthand how it impacted our family.

BiS profile: Damon Victor, Electric Bikes of Savannah

Our parent company, Greenpath Electric Bikes, launched in 2009 in Brooklyn because we saw New York City was becoming so congested with traffic, noise, and pollution. Electric bikes were our solution. 

Restaurant chief says industry crucial to building workforce

Savannah’s charm lures more than 13 million visitors each year, and they’ve got to eat somewhere. That’s good news for the state restaurant industry, said the state’s top restaurant official.

Karen Bremer, chief executive officer of the Georgia Restaurant Association, addresses the Savannah Downtown Business Association on Wednesday at SoHo South Cafe. (Eva Fedderly/For the Savannah Morning News)

Summer vocation on Tybee

For Tybee businesses and other groups who deal with the brutal swings of seasonal business, it’s all about the plan and commitment.

Photos by Josh Galemore/BiS

Yoga studio owner: Community focus is good business

Shelley Lowther, the founder of Dancing Dogs Yoga and Beetnix Savannah Juice Bar, brought a different business message Wednesday to the quarterly BiS Luncheon Series.

Shelley Lowther, owner of Dancing Dogs Yoga, speaks at the BiS Luncheon Series. (Steve Bisson/Savannah Morning News)

Woman finds her business in dance

Four years ago, a 25-year-old Rachael Moore launched a dance studio in a creative effort to do something that no one else in town had done.

Rachael Moore, owner of Salon de Baile.

Tourism advocates learn about film industry needs

If you’re wondering what will lure Hollywood to Savannah, Mitzi HIll can tell you. Hill was the keynote speaker at the Tourism Leadership Council’s June luncheon.  

Augusta mayor encourages Savannah to embrace change

Augusta Mayor Hardie Davis cited the power in change as the key to new development in his city. Davis was the speaker for the small business advocacy group’s monthly meeting.

MICHAEL HOLAHAN, Augusta Chronicle