BiS: BusinessInSavannah.com - Business news for the creative coast.

Eva Fedderly

Woodworkers preserve trees after Hurricane Matthew

A group of Savannah woodworkers have united in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew to preserve wood from trees that fell as a result of the storm.

Charley Ward, co-owner of Slowvannah Farms, straps down pieces of an elm tree. He will cut, dry and build furniture from the wood. (Photo by Steve Bisson/SMN)

Savannah-based entrepreneurs use iPads, iPhones to expedite chronic wound care

A company in Savannah is seeking to change the way the health care industry handles chronic wound care. Local health care veterans Katherine Piette and Joseph Ebberwein founded Corstrata one year ago in order to provide a new model to treat chronic wounds, which they say is more efficient and cost effective. 

Joseph Ebberwein and Katherine Piette, right, demonstrate a telemedicine consultation with Myra Varnado, Corstrata wound care specialist nurse located in New Orleans, using the company's live video app. (Steve Bisson/Savannah Morning News)

Self-defense business holds steady, true

While sales can collide with community fears, proprietors of self-defense businesses say their missions are more about personal safety, responsibility and awareness. “We try not to capitalize on the negatives,” said Thunderbolt Guns’ manager, Luther Loughridge. “But we want everyone to be safe.”

District attorney: Solving crime problem will take concerted efforts

District Attorney Meg Heap told 50 local business owners Thursday that there’s no magic to solve Savannah’s crime challenges and encouraged them to lobby their legislators for more information on criminals.

Self-defense business holds steady, true

While sales can collide with community fears, proprietors of self-defense businesses say their missions are more about personal safety, responsibility and awareness. “We try not to capitalize on the negatives,” said Thunderbolt Guns’ manager, Luther Loughridge. “But we want everyone to be safe.”

BiS profile: Mark Howard, Howard Financial Group

The motivation for launching Howard Financial Group initially came after my father passed away, and I saw firsthand how it impacted our family.

BiS profile: Damon Victor, Electric Bikes of Savannah

Our parent company, Greenpath Electric Bikes, launched in 2009 in Brooklyn because we saw New York City was becoming so congested with traffic, noise, and pollution. Electric bikes were our solution. 

Restaurant chief says industry crucial to building workforce

Savannah’s charm lures more than 13 million visitors each year, and they’ve got to eat somewhere. That’s good news for the state restaurant industry, said the state’s top restaurant official.

Karen Bremer, chief executive officer of the Georgia Restaurant Association, addresses the Savannah Downtown Business Association on Wednesday at SoHo South Cafe. (Eva Fedderly/For the Savannah Morning News)

Summer vocation on Tybee

For Tybee businesses and other groups who deal with the brutal swings of seasonal business, it’s all about the plan and commitment.

Photos by Josh Galemore/BiS

Yoga studio owner: Community focus is good business

Shelley Lowther, the founder of Dancing Dogs Yoga and Beetnix Savannah Juice Bar, brought a different business message Wednesday to the quarterly BiS Luncheon Series.

Shelley Lowther, owner of Dancing Dogs Yoga, speaks at the BiS Luncheon Series. (Steve Bisson/Savannah Morning News)

Woman finds her business in dance

Four years ago, a 25-year-old Rachael Moore launched a dance studio in a creative effort to do something that no one else in town had done.

Rachael Moore, owner of Salon de Baile.

Tourism advocates learn about film industry needs

If you’re wondering what will lure Hollywood to Savannah, Mitzi HIll can tell you. Hill was the keynote speaker at the Tourism Leadership Council’s June luncheon.  

Augusta mayor encourages Savannah to embrace change

Augusta Mayor Hardie Davis cited the power in change as the key to new development in his city. Davis was the speaker for the small business advocacy group’s monthly meeting.

MICHAEL HOLAHAN, Augusta Chronicle

Vacant store windows provide art exhibition space

At the corner of Bull and Anderson streets, an empty building space temporarily holds vibrant, geometric artwork on easels by a local Savannah College of Art and Design MFA student. The concept, called “Vacant Windows,” was created by local non-profit Art Rise Savannah.

Sheng Wang’s paintings hang at the Strong Gym on Bull and Anderson streets in a space destined to be a fitness and dance studio. (Steve Bisson/Savannah Morning News)

Official pushes business incentives at luncheon

A city official on Wednesday pleaded for local business leaders to take advantage of incentives and resources as a way to help spark the local economy.

Want a tattoo? Go Anonymous

Using the second floor of what once was the historic First Georgia Railroad and Bank, Ricky McGee opened Anonymous Tattoo in 2005 when there were only a handful of tattoo parlors in Savannah.

Ricky McGee, owner of Anonymous Tattoo, works with a client. (Josh Galemore/Savannah Morning News)

39 Rue de Jean works to attract 'locals'

Savannah’s new French brasserie, 39 Rue de Jean, located beneath Embassy Suites on West Oglethorpe Avenue, opened last November by Charleston-based Holy City Hospitality but is run by locals, including executive chef Drue Longo, a 30-year-old transplant from Philadelphia.

Executive chef Drue Longo of 39 Rue de Jean in Savannah sits in a booth on Saturday. The new French brasserie is located beneath Embassy Suites on West Oglethorpe Avenue. (Dylan Wilson/For the Savannah Morning News)

BiS profile: Nina Gompels, McDonald's restaurants

The economic impact in our Savannah community directly enhances the quality of life and wellbeing of our neighbors. Building the relationship between businesses and citizens translates into a symbiotic partnership between consumers and suppliers.

Couple builds business on champagne truffles

Kharye and Joel met in college and got married on Valentine’s Day. Thirty-five years later, they opened the chocolate factory for truffles that already have caught the eye of wedding planners and wineries throughout the United States and abroad.

Submitted photos- Le Dome Champagne Truffles are shaped like champagne corks.

New Day Counseling offers addiction treatment

Last January, Mike and Susan Farmer opened the addiction treatment center, NewDay Counseling, because they saw a need for intensive outpatient treatment in Savannah.

“There are a lot of people with the need, but not a lot of providers,” Mike told Business in Savannah.